Best Nail Gun for Fencing UK

Building garden fencing isn't the easiest of jobs - but a nail gun can make it significantly faster and save you from a fair few blisters! A quality, a high-powered nail gun is a toolbox staple for gardeners and landscapers and well worth investing in if you're considering erecting a garden fence yourself. With thousands of power tools on the market, we've collated a list of our favorite options, specifically designed for building fences or with features that make them perfectly suitable for this task.

The Best Five Nail Guns for UK Garden Fencing

GardeningCosts rates these products as some of the best - read on for full reviews and pricing information.

Low-Cost Nail Guns

  1. Tacwise 1564 Cordless Nail Gun - an affordable, cordless fencing nail gun in 4V or 12V models - available from £26.19 for the lower-powered model, including 2,000 staples.
  2. NuMax SFN64 Straight Finish Nailer 16 Gauge - a lightweight nail gun available for £55 with sequential firing and a comfortable grip handle.
  3. Silverline 868544 Air Brad Nailer - ideal for second fixes, this is another lightweight option with a safety trigger and a rubber handle, firing 18 gauge brad nails - available for £40.25 including VAT.

Professional Fencing Nail Guns

  1. Paslode IM65A 7.4V Second Fix Cordless Gas Nail Gun - just under £520 (including VAT) and suitable for heavy-duty usage with an 80% charge capacity in 25 minutes.
  2. Makita DPT353Z Pin Nailer - a cordless fencing nail gun with an anti dry-fire mechanism, trigger lock and 15 mm length. Note that the £349.95 price excludes the battery, and a full nail gun, Li-Ion battery, and charger set comes in at £453.85 as a package.
  3. Dewalt DCN680N-XJ Brushless XR Brad Nailer - £379 for the base unit, with a battery twin pack available for £125, plus a Flexvolt Fast Charger at £44.95.

We'll take a closer look at these models and how they compare shortly, but first, let's consider what you need to include on your must-have list when buying a great nail gun for fencing in the UK.

Fencing Nail Gun Buying Guide

If you're a gardener and regularly install or repair outdoor fences, it's safe to say you'll need a powerful nail gun that won't let you down even in the most challenging of weather conditions. Battery life also makes a considerable difference, especially if you're working somewhere remote, without access to mains power (or without the time to wait for the battery to recharge!). Corded models can be suitable for small DIY jobs, but ideally, a fencing nail gun should be pneumatic, so it'll keep working reliably. Some of the things to look for in a durable fencing nail gun include:

  • A swivel tube connector for any nail gun that isn't pneumatic - that means the cylinder doesn't get tangled, and it'll be much easier to reload.
  • Straightforward jam clearing. Every nail gun will stick from time to time, so the best models have easy access to get at the nail feed and get back to work.
  • Adjustable nail lengths are important since you'll need to control how deep you pin each nail.

Nail compatibility is important in choosing a fencing nail gun. That's because the type of nails you go for will depend on the type of fencing wood - and you'll need a nail gun that can handle longer nails for fastening rails to the fencepost and shorter nails for pickets. Pick a nail gun without the capacity to adjust to different nail sizes, and you'll likely end up beating each one in manually with a hammer, which somewhat defeats the object! Another deciding factor for fencing specialists in the range of modes and functions - ranging from single fire modes and bump action for a continuous movement. Transitioning between modes can take unnecessary time, so a fast reload will help you get through your fencing projects faster. Finally, think about weight if you spend a lot of time on fencing projects. The weight might not feel much at first, but it can be very important to have a light model that doesn't become difficult to handle after a couple of hours. Now, back to our reviews and a little more detail about the pros and cons of the nail guns for UK fencing we've mentioned above!

Best Fencing Nail Gun for: Small Fencing Budgets

If you're looking for a smart, simple cordless nail gun to manage a few fencing repairs at home, you can't argue with the Tacwise price point. The 4V battery is USB chargeable (1.5 hours for a full charge), and the loading magazine takes 18 grams, 10 mm nails. Each unit comes with a Li-ion battery, and at just a shade over one kg heavy, it's a decent option for a tight budget.

Best Fencing Nail Gun for: Low-Cost Pneumatic Nailing

NuMax's Straight Finish Nailer is a great all-rounder for a highly affordable price. The high-capacity magazine takes 100 straight finish nails at one, and the no-mar safety contact means you can't fire off a pin before you're in touch with your fencing panels or posts. The handle has a secure grip and keeps control over vibrations, and you get a 360-degree exhaust, adjustable to keep dust away from your eyes. There is a good depth adjust feature and quick jam release without taking the tool to pieces.

Best Fencing Nail Gun for: Light Fencing Jobs

We'll pause here to share a caveat - the Silverline 868544 Air Brad Nailer is a great tool at a very good cost, but it's better at lighter work rather than a heavy-duty fencing project. However, if you're looking to shore up some lightweight panels or add finishing touches to garden fences, it's a very competitive choice, designed primarily for second fixes. The aluminum body is lovely and lightweight, with a tactile rubber handle, and compatible with 18 gauge brads between 10 mm and 50 mm - with a maximum 7.0 bar pressure.

Best Fencing Nail Gun for: Fast Charging

The Paslode IM65A isn't the cheapest nail gun - but if you prefer an electric model with a super-sturdy battery, it's a good bet. The battery charges up to 80% in just 25 minutes, so it isn't too difficult to charge up on the go if you have a power bank or commercial charging station. The blow-molded carry case is a smart touch, and the lightweight model isn't too hefty to manage for busy days of fencing. Every battery charge supports up to 10,000 shots, and there is a magazine window so you know when to reload, with a neat angled magazine so you can get into tight fencing corners without a struggle.

Best Fencing Nail Gun for: Precision Nails

The Makita DPT353Z fires tiny, almost invisible 23-gram brad nails, which leave a microscopic puncture - and, as you'd expect from this sterling brand, the nail gun is well balanced and doesn't feel heavy even with the battery attached. It comes with a clip to fasten to a holster and has a great range of safety features. Our only complaint is that the lock is hidden away, intended to stop you from accidentally setting your nail gun to live - but it's not great for bigger hands to get to. The battery power is impressive - you can use the nail gun with a four or five-amp battery for a whole day and only end up one bar down. A great reload mechanism and an Allen key to clear jambs make it an all-around excellent nail gun for fencing.

Best Fencing Nail Gun for: Speedy Fencing Erection

Dewalt is another reliable brand to buy, and this nail gun is incredibly fast, firing off four nails per second if you ask it to, which makes it very snappy. This nail gun is compatible with 18 gauge brad nails from 15 mm to 54 mm (a little longer than the Makita), and it has a smooth barrel to help you aim. No such issues here with the trigger lock mechanism, and misfires are rare.

Frequently Asked Questions

Still, unsure which nail gun is best suited to your fencing projects and budget? Next, we'll answer some of the frequently asked questions to help you make great buying choices.

What is the Difference Between a Nail Gun and a Nailer?

There is no difference - a nailer is another description for a nail gun. Both are equipment pieces that drive nails into wood, ideal for fencing projects and a range of home improvement tasks.

What Size Nails Should I Use to Erect a Wooden Fence?

Your ideal nail size (in terms of gauge and length) will very much depend on what type of fencing wood and the density of the panels or fence posts you're working with. Most nail guns we've explored here take brad nails, or brads, which are steel wire 18-gauge nails suitable for fencing since they're a little thinner than a standard nail, with a smaller nail head that makes them discreet in a garden fence post. Brad's nails are also advisable since the narrow gauge means you won't split the wood if you're using untreated or softer wood before weather-proofing. Shank's nails are best for fastening pickets to the fencing, and you'll want longer, stronger nails for the fencepost infrastructure to ensure a long-lasting fencing system that won't be too fragile to cope with strong winds.

How Much Maintenance Does a Nail Gun Need?

If you take a bit of time to oil a pneumatic nail gun, it'll usually last longer and cost less in repairs and servicing. It takes just a minute or two, and you don't need any expertise to get started:

  • Take out the nails and make sure your nail gun is in safe mode.
  • Disconnect the air hose.
  • Plop about two to four drops of oil into the pneumatic part of the gun.
  • Reconnect the air hose, and pull the trigger five times or more to disperse the oil evenly.

Load your nails, and you're good to go!

How Important is it to Have a Compressor to Use With a Nail Gun?

You only need an air compressor if you have a pneumatic nail gun - the compressor provides the compact air your nail gun needs to power the nails out when you press the trigger. If you're working on smaller projects or occasional fencing repairs, a battery-powered nail gun might be an easier (and cheaper!) option since you won't need to manage an air compressor and hose.

What Safety Measures Do I Need to Know About When Using a Nail Gun?

High-powered nail guns require very strict safety controls and can be extremely hazardous if in the wrong hands or used irresponsibly. The good news is that most quality nail guns have a list of safety features that make it hard to make a mistake. Sequential triggers mean the gun can only fire when you pull the trigger - and a contact sensor means the tool won't release a nail unless it is in direct contact with the piece of fence paneling you're attaching. However, it's still wise to use safety glasses and ear defenders if you use nail guns for a large part of the day. It's also advisable to avoid any wires or trip hazards and make sure garden spaces you're working in are free of pets and children that might inadvertently walk into the path of a nail gun or pick up a tool in between use.

What is the Best Nail Gun for Garden Fencing UK?

There are thousands of excellent nail guns available, so a lot depends on how often you expect to use them, the size of fencing panels you're working with, and whether you're buying a nail gun for a quick DIY project or as a professional gardener or fencer. Framing nailers are the best option for bigger projects, including decking, but you'll still want to make sure your nail gun can take small and large gauge nails to be helpful for the full scope of fencing projects you're likely to work on.

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